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Month: December 2017

People, Processes and Tools

This article was originally posted on swombat.com on October 24th, 2011.

Some years ago, one of my managers used to repeat this “Accenture truism” (or so he designated it): to fix or improve something, first you need the right people, then you need the right processes to help those people work together, then finally you need the right tools to support those processes. People, processes, and tools – in that order.

This is even more true for tech startups than for corporations. As geeks, whenever we face a problem, we often start by looking for a tool to fix it. “Our team isn’t communicating properly – let’s set up Campfire.” “But I don’t like Campfire, why don’t we use Yammer?” “Yammer and Campfire are so lame, let’s just use good old IRC.”

This is the wrong approach. Tools by themselves rarely resolve problems in your business. If your team isn’t communicating, you need to solve that problem step by step.

First you need to figure out if that’s because of a “people” problem. Maybe one member of your team just doesn’t want to talk to the others. If that’s the case, no tools or processes are going to fix that. For example, many sales organisations try to get their salespeople to communicate everything they know about every client – but salespeople don’t want to do that, because it makes them more easily replaceable. Setting up a CRM tool doesn’t solve that problem, until you fix the people, by giving them the right incentives to do what you want (or, if that’s impossible, either changing what you want or changing the people).

Then, you need to look at the “processes” part of the problem. For example, assuming your team wants to communicate with each other, maybe they can’t because they tend to sleep at random schedules in different parts of the world. That’s a process problem that can be fixed by, for example, declaring a certain time each day “team time”. For example, you can anoint the period between 2pm and 4pm in some timezone as “team time”, and require everyone to be available to chat at that time every weekday.

Finally, once you’ve got the right people and they have the right processes in place to support them, then you can start looking for tools to support those processes. Depending on what you actually want “team time” to look like, you might choose campfire, GTalk, IRC, or any number of other tools. But by now, you can select the tool based on whether or not it supports your processes, rather than whether or not it’s the sexy SaaS app of the month.

Thoughts from 2017

The principle still feels true to me. If anything, it feels even more true. The biggest addition would be a much deeper and nuanced understanding of what working on the “people” and “process” problems can mean, and how they feed into each other. At GrantTree we’ve even adopted and developed a whole interview aimed towards figuring out how well people will be able to adapt to our complex processes (open culture┬ámakes significant demands on people’s abilities), so we try not to find ourselves hiring people who are perfectly fine individuals but not well suited to our environment.

As the years have passed, tools, however, have become less and less interesting in and of themselves.

Steve Jobs Lives On

This was originally posted on swombat.com on October 6th 2011.

I’m sure there’ll be thousands (probably tens of thousands) of blog posts, comments, and other forms of expression and eulogies about Steve Jobs. The man had that much influence over us. Maybe some, maybe all of them will repeat what I’m going to say here, but that’s not why I’m writing this. Fundamentally, it’s because I feel compelled. I can’t not write it.

I was sitting in a meeting about UK legislation throughout the morning, and found out, at the end, that Steve had died. Even though it was obvious that he was going to die sometime, it was still incredibly sudden and shocking. It’s amazing how personally and emotionally touched I feel by this.

1.

First, it seems amazing, unbelievable, that Steve Jobs could be dead so suddenly. His death at a young, young 56 is a brutal reminder that death takes us all.

Even if you’re a multi-billionaire, someone who’s changed the world twice over, loved by many, influential beyond measure, leading one of the world’s most powerful human organisations, living what was presumably a model life from a health perspective, even if you’re someone who literally has all the world at his disposal, still the great scythe will sweep and it will not miss. Taxes may not be certain. Death is.

2.

A second thought is of the empty “reserved” chair, visible in the front row at the Apple keynote just two days ago, was reserved for a man who was probably lying on his death bed at the time. The empty chair reminds us that Steve worked until the very end, resigning only when, presumably, his declining health made it impossible for him to work.

Like Freddy Mercury said (and did, working until June, dying in November): The Show Must Go On.

Steve died as the curtain fell. I’m not ashamed to say that it actually makes me cry a little, here in this coffee shop. Oh well, I’ve always been a sentimental.

3.

A third thought is about what a tragic, personal loss this is to, well, everyone who loves technology. You may have loved Steve Jobs or hated him, but what you can’t deny is that he was a force for the progress of technology.

Steve Jobs revolutionised the world of consumer computing with the Mac. He upended the music industry (and a few others), transformed consumer electronics, forced the mobile phone industry to leap kicking and screaming into the 21st century, and finally pushed forward a device which will possibly represent the future of computing. The shape of things to come – cue Battlestar Galactica music in the background.

Seen from the perspective of where technology was a mere 10 years ago, the iPhone and iPad are, quite simply, science fiction. No matter your emotional stance on Steve Jobs, it is impossible to deny that, on a technological level, he made a big dent in the world.

What a tragic, personal loss this is to all who love technology, and even to those who don’t. Here was a truly exceptional man, who made the world better in the way he could, and he is no longer with us. We have lost him – all of us. We’ll have to make do without him.

4.

A final thought occurs, a thought about life and death that I’ve been mulling over for some time.

I don’t have much experience of death, but here is my perspective. While we live, we influence the world around us, through our will (which led some philosophers to declare that will was the fundamental unit of reality). When we die, that will is extinguished.

How quickly it seems that the world erases all trace of most people. Some live on for some time, through great art or great acts, but eventually, it erases all, without fail, without exception. The broom follows the scythe and sweeps everything away. The well of the past is indeed bottomless and filled with the forgotten memories of those who came before us.

And so with Steve Jobs. One day he will be utterly forgotten, not even an atom of a memory will remain, even if humanity lives on. But for now, what Steve Jobs achieved in Apple, over a brief decade since he came back to it, was to create, in a medium other than art, an extension of himself. Apple is modelled after Steve’s vision, and it is fair to say that it is an extension of what he learned, through his life, and, more importantly, of what he willed. Apple is Steve’s will, externalised.

And Apple lives on. And Apple is, technically, immortal (as in, not subject to mortality – obviously it can go bankrupt). One day it will err and die, but its potential lifespan is considerable, given where it is now.

Certainly, Apple will change, but so would Steve, had he lived.

This is a poor form of immortality. As Woody Allen said, “I don’t want to achieve immortality through my works, I want to achieve immortality through not dying”. But whereas art, to a large extent, is static, a company is an entity – legally and in reality – capable of making decisions, of changing the world, capable, in short, of will.

It may not be a perfect proxy for Steve’s will, but it’s what we have left after this great man has passed away. That, and the science fiction he made real for us.

Thoughts from 2017

Most of the thoughts in this article still feel true, but as my articles about my ill-fated adventures with the new Macbook Pro have perhaps made clear, I suspect that the answer to the question of whether Steve Jobs’ will lives on in Apple is, sadly, no. But I might be wrong, who knows. Jobs made a few mistakes in his time too, though generally they didn’t lack vision. Time will tell.

Still, I wanted to preserve this article on danieltenner.com.

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